Posts Tagged ‘child welfare’

Foundation Brief Featured on SCOTUS Blog

SCOTUS Blog, a highly respected U.S. Supreme Court-watching resource, this week featured petitions, including one from the Parental Right Foundation, related to whether the High Court should take up the case I.B. v. Woodard. Woodard is the case in which the Parental Rights Foundation filed an amicus curiae (“friend of the court”) brief to the…

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Foundation Files Brief to US Supreme Court

US Supreme Court

WASHINGTON — The Parental Rights Foundation today filed a brief with the United States Supreme Court in the case of I.B. and Jane Doe v. April Woodard. The aim of the brief is to urge the Supreme Court to halt unnecessary, traumatic strip-searches in child-welfare investigations. “It’s a tragedy,” said Parental Rights Foundation President Jim…

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Review: They Took the Kids Last Night by Diane Redleaf

They Took the Kids Last Night

Looking for More on the Supreme Court amicus brief? It’s here (and we apologize for the extra click). —Michael T. Ramey, Executive Director Published in late 2018, Diane Redleaf’s They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families at Risk is an excellent read. Redleaf, who works with our lobbying arm in…

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Paid to Pull Children from Their Homes

money

“The federal government has always paid us only if we pull children from their homes” Crouch is West Virginia’s Secretary of Health and Human Resources, head of the department of the same name. Last week Crouch spoke to state lawmakers about upcoming changes resulting from the Family First Prevention Services Act, recently passed as part…

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Mom Investigated for Neglect: “There’s Something Really Wrong”

“For something like this to happen to me, there’s something really wrong.” That is the thought of a lot of good parents who suddenly find themselves caught up in a child welfare investigation without cause, and it’s the exact words of Wilmette, Illinois, mother Corey Widen to the Chicago Tribune last week. On August 2,…

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The “Age of Fear” in the “Land of Surveillance”

The "Age of Fear" in the "Land of Surveillance"

It’s one of the toughest balancing acts you face as a parent: how to teach your child independence and self-reliance while keeping them safe in a dangerous and interconnected world. I say “interconnected” because, as wonderful as connection is, in some instances it can cause more harm than good. A key example: anonymous reporting. You…

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Troubling Trends in Foster Care

Foster Care Trends

The Parental Rights Foundation this week reviewed the five latest AFCARS reports and uncovered some disturbing trends. According to the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) summary of 2016 data released in October of last year and the four previous reports, the number of children in foster care nationwide has been trending…

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Prepare to Be Shocked

Prepare to be shocked, or even angry. Imagine you are driving your young daughter home from preschool. You’ve just endured a child welfare investigation stemming from allegations that someone else physically abused your daughter, allegations which have thankfully been deemed unfounded. The intrusion was mercifully brief compared to many, and the investigator is now out…

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State of Parental Rights in America 2017

The Supreme Court once declared, “This primary role of parents in the upbringing of their children is now established beyond debate as an enduring American tradition.” Wisconsin v. Yoder, 406 U.S. 205 (1972) at 232. So, how are we doing with that “enduring American tradition” today? Unfortunately, not so well. Even with advances in some…

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The State of Parental Rights in America 2015

Please see the newest State of Parental Rights in America report. Last January’s “The State of Parental Rights in America” was so well received – and so helpful for informing parents and policy-makers about the growing parental rights issue – that we decided to make it an annual report. Sadly, not a lot has changed…

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